Cat Toys

Cat playtime and toys incorporates predatory games of "play aggression". Cats' behaviors when playing are those similar to hunting behavior. These activities allow kittens and younger cats to grow and acquire cognitive and motor skills, and to socialize with other cats. Cat play behavior can be either solitary (with toys or other objects) or social (with animals and people). They can play with a multitude of toys ranging from strings, to small furry toys resembling what would be prey (e.g. mice) to plastic bags.

When playing with your cat, consider their success rate of catching their prey.  A cat that catches its prey every time soon gets bored, and a cat that never gets it just loses interest. The ideal hunting success rate is around 1 in 3 to 1 in 6. Capturing prey at this rate generally maximises a cat's interest and enjoyment of the game.

Some precautions, however.  Because play is about predation, and a highly excited cat can cause minor injuries in the excitement of the moment. With most cats, it is wise to keep playthings at least 20 cm (8") away from fingers or eyes, and avoid encouraging a cat to eat inedible toys. If playing with the bare hands, a cat will generally resist using its claws or biting too hard, but a cat that becomes extremely excited may accidentally inflict injuries to its human playmate in the form of light scratches or small puncture wounds from biting too hard. 

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